Ribbon

WRISTBANDS ARE HERE

Wristbands as per the photo are available for ALL with thanks to Richard Allen.

They are black shiny debossed (sunk in) print on white silicone bands made in the UK by a firm in Kingwinsford in the West Midlands. They also supply products to Next, The Household Cavalry, NHS, The National Trust and many more.

A pack of 5 bands costs £6.00 which includes p&p

You will need a Visa, MasterCard or Maestro Card:-

Click the link to Mydonate on the right-hand side of this screen. Put in the cost of the packs you require (£6.00 each) tick the gift aid if you pay UK income tax then the charity will get an extra 25% from the government,. Put your details in; email, name, address etc., and tick the box to be contacted by the charity. On the next screen put your card details in and submit the donation.

Afterwards send an email to richard.allen@ntlworld.com giving details of number of packs name and address including post code. Once I hear from Liz Blows that the donation has been received I will despatch the goods asap

If you wish to sell the wristbands they are £1.00 each or more and any money made for the charity can be donated by using the mydonate link.

All profits made will go to The Stiff Man Syndrome Charity.

Wristbands

Liz attended the Eurordis Summer school for rare diseases.

She made the following video, but the sound quality isn't good, so here is the transcript that include the statistics of other autoimmune diseases which people with SPS suffer.

The statistics are as follows; Of 115 patients with SPS. 64-IDDM. 36-Hypothyroidism. 12-Vitiligo. 11-Pernicious anemia. 10-Sjorgens.
They are the top five. Now in no particular order, the others.IgA Neuropathy-2. Asthma 2. Ulcertive colitis 4. Gastritis 1. Dystonia-2. Rheumatoid arthritis-3. Raynards-8. Lupus-4. MS-1. MGUS-1. Addisons-4. Motor neuron-1. Coeliac-9. Hydradenitis-1. Lichen sclerosis-1. Psoiriasis-3. Graves-3. Myasthenia gravis-7. Hashimoto's-4. CIDP-1. Polymyostis-2. Discord lupus-1. Osteoporosis-2. Ankylosing spondolosis-1. Exema-1. Epilepsy-2. Fibromylitis-1. Cluster heasaches-1. Ataxia-1. Periferal neuropathy-2. Horner syndrome-1. Lichen plantus-1. Orthostatic hypotention-1. Psoriatic arthritis-2. POTS-1. Idiopathic urticaria-1. Idiopathic neuropathy-1. Hypogammaglobulinemia-1. Sarcodosis-2. IBS-1. Cerabella ataxia-1. Postural BP-1. Endrometriosis-1. Burgers disease-1. Litchtheim's disease-1. Fibromyalgia-1.

Liz at the Eurordis Summer School - Video

Dr Scott Newsome Explains Stiff Person Syndrome

 

  • Liz Blows attends the

    Rare Disease Day at the House of Commons

  • Liz RDD

    She relates:

    On the 25th February I attended a reception at the House of Commons. It was held by Rare Disease UK. I was there as a representative of SPS.

    The first speaker was Liz Kendall MP, the shadow minister for the "care of older people and care of rare diseases". She spoke about the problems families have when caring for someone with a rare disease, and the fact that one in three family members has to give up work.

    Earl Howe, the minister in charge of rare diseases spoke next. He said this reception was one of the "landmark events of the year". He spoke about Genomics England: There are now 11 new genome centers in the UK. They are trying to build a lasting legacy which will make this country a world leader in diagnosis and treatment of rare diseases (he reported that there are 6,000 known rare diseases).

    Fiona Marly was the last speaker. She is the head of Highly Specialised Services for NHS England. She spoke in depth about her role, also talking in detail about genomics England's clinical interpretation partnerships (GECIP).

    There are 3 million people in the UK who have a rare disease.

    There are 80 Countries around the world that now have a Rare Disease Day (February 28th).

    RDD Images

    Credit for Earl Howe's photo to Rare Disese UK. Liz Kendall's photo taken from Flickr.

     

    Golf News: Renewed Sponsorship of Major Tournament in 2015

    In our on-going campaign to raise awareness, the Charity has once again agreed to sponsor, for the fourth year running, Beverley Golf Club's premier competition, the Order of Merit for 2015 (pictured are charity founder Liz Blows and 2014 champion golfer Darren Smith). In each of the first three years, around 160 golfers have taken part, contributing almost £500 every year, which is now the charity’s main source of income. The tournament begins in April and runs through to October with a total of 38 events at the East Yorkshire Westwood club. You can read about past events on the Order of Merit Golf Tournament Page
    • Order of Merit 2014
    •  

    Stiff Person Syndrome UK support and charity with Liz and Ang.
  • Charity Sets Up Video Links

    Video records of SPS/SMS-related topics are now online to show the world how the condition affects sufferers. Click here.

    The Videos are also accessible from the "Links" menu.

    If you would like us to host or link to your SPS related Videos please contact us at admin@smssupportgroup.co.uk.  

    SPS Forum and Facebook

    Apart from the ever-evolving look and feel of the site, we have further boosted our reach by the creation of a discussion Forum and, most recently, the addition of our very own Facebook page, together with a number of other innovations to help us keep pace in the ever-changing modern world. Please find time to fully explore our website and discover all it has to offer in the never-ending campaign to raise awareness of SPS at home and around the world.

    Membership

    Membership of the group is restricted to UK and Ireland residents only, although we’re always pleased to hear from fellow sufferers, their families and carers around the world (see Links) and our presence on Facebook means we are within reach of everyone in the global community.

    Getting in Touch

    You can email us, ’phone on the dedicated SPS Support Group telephone number or click the ’phone link to use Skype, and also find us on Facebook

     

                01482 868881

     

    eMail

     

    Facebook

    Why not add a badge with the international ribbon symbol to your Facebook Picture from here:

     

    If you have any technical issues with this site please eMail here

    eMail

  •  

    Stiff Person Syndrome.

    This site is solely for the support of those suffering from Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS). Family and friends of sufferers are also welcome to the same support. The site may be of interest to caregivers, care professionals and researchers, together with advocates for the condition and the general public.

    Donations

    We always welome donations, no matter how large or small. You can donate on-line or via a donations form.

    To donate by secure credit card transaction, please use the button below. The full value of your donation (less credit card fees) comes to the charity.

    BT MyDonate  

     

    For postal donations please download the form here.

    The group and charity was set up by Liz Blows with the following aims:

    (1) The relief of sickness and the protection and preservation of the health of persons affected by Stiff Person Syndrome, together with their families and carers.

    (2) On-going education and awareness-raising within the medical profession and the general public of Stiff Person Syndrome.

    (3) The promotion of research into the causes, effects, treatment and management of Stiff Person Syndrome.

    "Stiff Man Syndrome" (SMS) was the name assigned to the condition when first identified in the 1950s by Moersch and Woltman in the USA. In recent years, in the modern world of PC, the condition has become more widely known as "Stiff Person Syndrome" (SPS). SPS does not differentiate between sex, colour, or creed, although UK evidence tends to suggest women are most at risk.

    SPS is an auto-immune neurological condition. It is unique due to its lack of significant similarity to any other neurological diseases. Although rare, once observed it is quite unforgettable. However, many neurologists and GPs are still unaware of the condition. In most cases, the first symptoms are insidious and victims are often initially misdiagnosed with anxiety or depression.